The Robots’ Rebellion Part 1

The Robots' Rebllion

And so begins my long, and somewhat joyful, reading and blogging about the wonderful books of Mr David Icke. The Robots’ Rebellion begins with a chapter titled The Takeover Bid under a part one section of the book titled The Darkness.

Now I’m no sycophant I don’t believe everything people tell me or everything I read I only believe in things I can accept, stuff that somehow makes sense to me and my experiences in this mad crazy world we assume is real.

Much of chapter one of this book is taken up with spiritual musings and the assumption psychics are making accurate claims about the nature of the universe and the formation of planet Earth.

Personally I don’t believe in psychic powers, I’d like to live in a world in which super powers were a reality but I don’t, I’d like to have super powers of my own Superman style super powers but I wouldn’t be a decent nice guy trying to save everyone and the world instead I’d make everyone, everywhere, fucking behave, but besides my obsession with accidentally Marvel style acquiring super powers there’s no way I’m ever going to have super powers and neither are you.

This first chapter was hard re-reading for me and I confess I skipped by parts of it, Atlantis, blah, King Arthur, meh.

The only real part of the chapter I was concerned with was the opening paragraph, ‘who created God?’ I’m an Atheist by nature for me God, Jesus, Heaven and Hell are merely fictions a method used to keep people under control but even though I am an Atheist with no spiritual beliefs or leanings whatsoever I do wish to know the origin of God.

I figure the fictional creation is an amalgamation of Egyptian and Babylonian beliefs and perhaps a little bit here and a little bit there stolen from other Middle Eastern cultures lost to us in time.

For blind believers in the existence of fictional beings roaming this vast universe God is the ultimate in power and majesty, according to believers God is omniscient, which means He has infinite knowledge, basically He knows everything about everything, the cleverest being in the entire universe, way smarter than me and thee and even smarter than Einstein and Newton. Clever isn’t something I’d attribute to any religious belief in God, for the smartest being in all the universe His worshippers sure are fucking stupid. He needs smarter people to believe in Him, I’m not smart, I’m an idiot but even I find other idiots fucking annoying and I’ve always assumed smart people find idiots unbearable God is the smartest being in all the universe He’d despise idiots.

So He’d hate, with passion, all His believers.

God is also supposed to be omnipotent, all powerful, not only the smartest being in all the universe but also the most badass, He could, in theory, kill the entire universe with but a thought no one, not even Superman, can fight and defeat God only…

… in the Bible, Old Testament, the fictional character Jacob wrestles and defeats the fictional God of the Hebrews, the all mighty and all powerful Yahweh, IHVH, but if God possesses unlimited power, enough power to end the universe, how could Jacob defeat Him?

God is also supposed to be omnipresent, which means He’s everywhere at once, the entire universe is God and God is the entire universe, kinda like Eternity from Marvel comics. So He, God, would know what’s happening as it happens maybe even before it happens so nothing would be a surprise to Him and yet the behaviour of the humans he destroys in the Great Deluge takes Him by surprise.

The origin of the God of the Bible might, no one it seems knows for sure, originate in Egypt when the pharaoh Akhenaten created a monotheistic religion and usurped the long established pantheon that dominated the land, Akhenaten’s One God, a Sun God, could have been the inspiration for Yahweh, though Yahweh seems like an angry storm god rather than a hopeful sun god.

I doubt anyone will ever know for sure where or how God originated but there’s one thing that’s for damn sure He is only a fictional character created by Man and not the other way around.

This first chapter of David Icke’s conspiracy, ancient mystery, is very disappointing, it seemed to me mostly nonsense I’ve read elsewhere before, bog standard random ideas about ancient human history that’s predicated upon lies and misunderstandings I’d hoped for more, it’s no The Biggest Secret and now I’m wishing I’d started with that book and ignored the two books that preceded it.

Sigh!

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